“The Cause of Humanity Requires It”

by Jesse Nasta

Elizabeth Keckly, well known as Mary Todd Lincoln’s dressmaker and friend, was also founder of the Contraband Relief Association in 1862, an organization that aided “contrabands,” formerly enslaved individuals who had escaped to freedom in the District of Columbia.   

According to Keckly, when she told Mary Lincoln about her efforts to raise money for her Contraband Relief Association, Mrs. Lincoln immediately asked her husband to give Keckly $200 of the $1,000 General Corcoran had “deposited” with him for the relief of Union soldiers. In a November 3, 1862, letter to her husband, Mary Lincoln wrote, “The soldiers are well supplied with comfort,” while “the immense number of Contrabands in W[ashington] are suffering intensely, many without bed covering & having to use any bits of carpeting to cover themselves.”  Lincoln agreed to give her the money.  Later in her 1868 memoir, Behind the Scenes, Keckly emphasized that “Mrs. Lincoln made frequent contributions, as also did the president.   

The First Annual Report of Keckly’s Contraband Relief Association, as published by the Christian Recorder in August 1863, reveals how greatly the Lincolns’ $200 donation aided her effort. While the association raised $357.64 on its own through church concerts and festivals, the Lincolns’ was the association’s largest single donation, accounting for nearly a quarter of the $885.64 collected during its first year.

Mr. Jesse Nasta is a summer 2007 intern at President Lincoln’s Cottage.

2 Comments

Filed under History

2 responses to ““The Cause of Humanity Requires It”

  1. Susan Baraka

    Hey , nice work Jesse.Congrats on everything. Miss talking to you. Sorry we lost touch. Email me if you would like.

  2. presidentlincolnscottage

    Ms. Baraka:

    FYI, Jesse was an intern for the project during the summer of 2007. We do not have current contact info from him.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s